Tag Archive | ubuntu

Ubuntu User Days next weekend!

Next weekend, from Saturday at 14:30 UTC to Sunday at 03:00 UTC the Classroom team will be hosting the Ubuntu User Days!

User Days was created to be a set of chat-based classes offered during a two days period to teach the beginning or intermediate Ubuntu user the basics to get them started with Ubuntu. User Days sessions include:

  • how to get help
  • the basics of how to use the command line
  • different ways to install software
  • equivalent programs
  • and much more!

You can check the full schedule here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UserDays

The best thing is, everyone can come! If you want to participate, you just need to join #ubuntu-classroom and #ubuntu-classroom chat on your IRC client, or just click here: Webchat.

We hope to see you next weekend!

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Ubuntu Developer Week: Review of Day 3

Unfortunately 13.04’s Ubuntu Developer Week is over. All the logs and videos are linked from the timetable, so you can still enjoy the sessions again and again. We hope you had a great time and we will see you soon again in one of our Ubuntu development channels.

Here’s what happened on day 3:

  1. Automated Testing in Ubuntu & Automated Testing TechnologiesMartin Pitt did a great job of summarising the current work in the Quality Assurance team. It’s getting more and more important to automatically assure us that software we rely on still provides the functionality we expect and nothing breaks. Check out the log and get an idea of how diverse the activities are and where you can get involved.
  2. Syncing your app’s data with u1db — Stuart Langridge has been involved in Ubuntu One since ages and knows how to make app authors happy. If you want simple data storage and syncing without headaches, have a look at u1db and Stuart’s introduction to u1db!
  3. Interacting with Debian’s Bug Tracking System — You explain things best if you talk about things you make use of every day. As Stefano Rivera is both a Debian and Ubuntu developer, this talk was quite easy to deliver for him. Debian’s Bug Tracking System is a central place of exchange between the two projects and Stefano’s session will surely make it clearer to you.
  4. Building Ubuntu images & The Ubuntu Nexus 7 images — Oliver Grawert has been building Ubuntu images for various platforms for quite a few cycles already, so he knows the problems you probably run into most. His sessions give some good insight into what’s involved in bringing Ubuntu up on all kinds of devices.
  5. Fixing packages to cross-build — As a member of the Foundations team Dmitrijs Ledkovs has gathered quite some experience cleaning up problems, including build problems in the archive for a while now. Check out the session to find out how to make packages build for other architectures most easily. Get involved in fixing these issues once and for all.
  6. Developers RoundtableBenjamin Drung and Michael Bienia were kind enough to take on the last session of UDW and answer all the remaining questions regarding Ubuntu development. Be sure to check out the log as your favourite question might well be among the ones answered. 🙂

Oh, and before we forget it: join us in the Automated Testing Hackfest today!

Ubuntu Developer Week: Review of Day 2, Outlook: last day

Ubuntu Developer Week is passing by much too quickly, as always. Still it’s great to see how many new people get involved, find out more about Ubuntu Development and get involved. Day 2 was yesterday and brought us many great sessions. Here’s what happened yesterday:

  1. How to write apps for Ubuntudpm: David Planella was well prepared as always and gave some good insights into what it takes to take an app from idea to a working app. He got quite a number of questions during the session, so I guess we can expect more apps coming to Ubuntu soon. 🙂
  2. Ubuntu App review process explainedcoolbhavi: Bhavani Shankar explained the next step in terms of apps and demonstrated how a typical App Review works. Unfortunately the session was interrupted by a bot misbehaving towards the end, but lots of questions were still answered.
  3. Finding memory leaksachiang (Hangout!): Memory leaks can become huge problems in no time, and sometimes it’s not easy to debug or fix them. Alex Chiang is passionate about fixing them and provided a great session about how and where to start.
  4. Testing with autopilotballoons: Nicholas Skaggs and Thomi Richards are becoming the autopilot double-act (you will likely see them in tomorrow’s Automated Testing Hackfest as well). They gave a very nice introduction into autopilot and how to use it to test UI elements properly. Be sure to check it out and make good use of it.
  5. Unity integrationmhall119: Michael Hall, the author of “Hello Unity” and things like “singlet” knows how Unity works and how best to integrate your apps with it. It’s these finishing touches which make your app stand out and give the users the nice feeling of a seamless experience.

Here’s what’s on for today. Hope to see you all there!

  • 15:00 UTC – Automated Testing in Ubuntu — pitti
  • 16:00 UTC – Syncing your app’s data with u1db — aquarius
  • 17:00 UTC – Interacting with Debian’s Bug Tracking System — tumbleweed
  • 17:30 UTC – Building Ubuntu images — ogra
  • 18:00 UTC – The Ubuntu Nexus 7 images — ogra
  • 18:30 UTC – Fixing packages to cross-build – xnox
  • 19:00 UTC – Developers Roundtable — bdrung & geser

This is the last day of this cycle’s UDW, so make sure you let your friends know and show up yourself. Join in!

Ubuntu Developer Week Starting Soon!

Each cycle, the Ubuntu Classroom team holds an event called the Ubuntu Developer Week. Here, you can be part of different workshops, where you will be able to learn about the different tools and processes in the Ubuntu Community, in respect of Development.

This cycle, the Ubuntu Developer Week will be held from Tuesday, January the 29th to Thursday, January the 31st, which is exactly a week from now. Sessions will include an introduction to Ubuntu Development and to patch systems, workshops on working with upstreams, writing applications, finding memory leaks and testing, and some explanations about the App Review process. It will all finish with a Developers Roundtable, where you will be able to hear experiences from other people, as well as sharing your own experiences. More information about the event and the full schedule can be found here.

Sessions will start at 15:00 UTC, and finish at 20:00 UTC. You can check the event timing on your local time zone here.

All classes will be given on #ubuntu-classroom on irc.freenode.net, and discussions and questions will take place on #ubuntu-classroom-chat on irc.freenode.net. If you have any questions, please make sure to prefix it with the word ‘QUESTION:’ (in capitals and without quotes) for the bot to take it.

If you think anyone may be interested on the event, make sure to share the links, and we’ll see you there!

Ubuntu Quantal OpenWeek and Ask Mark!: October 24th-26th

In just eight years, Ubuntu has become one of the most popular Linux distributions in the world with millions of users and a thriving community. Ever wondered what all the fuss is about? How have we achieved such a great feat in such a short space of time? Here’s where you can find out. Ubuntu Open Week is a week of IRC and On Air! tuition and Q+A sessions all about getting involved in the rock-and-roll world that is the Ubuntu community. We organise this week for the beginning of a new release cycle to help new contributors get involved.

Ubuntu Open Week takes place in #ubuntu-classroom on irc.freenode.net (#ubuntu-classroom-chat for questions) for IRC, and www.ubuntuonair.com for On Air!.

This cycle it will start on October 24th, and finish October 26th each day with sessions from 13 to 18 UTC, having a special Ask Mark! session on Thursday, at 10 UTC. All sessions on Wednesday and Thursday will run as usual, on IRC (links above), and on Friday, we’ll close up with some Ubuntu on Air! sessions, so you can actually see the instructors.

During the “Ask Mark” session, community members are invited to ask Mark Shuttleworth (sabdfl) questions about the Ubuntu project. You will ask your questions in #ubuntu-classroom-chat with the prefix QUESTION: and JoseeAntonioR or philipballew will be selecting specific questions to pass along to Mark in the main #ubuntu-classroom channel.

Then, from October 24-26th from 13:00 through 18:00 UTC, we will be hosting several sessions from different teams, including the Development, News, Flavors (including Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Edubuntu and Ubuntu Studio), Translations, QA, LoCo, Women, Accomplishments, IRC, App Development, Desktop, Manual and MOTU teams.

To check out the full schedule and learn more about the event, visit the Ubuntu Open Week page on the Ubuntu wiki: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuOpenWeek

We hope to see you there! But if not, as always, logs will be available after each session, and linked to the schedule at the end of each day.

Ubuntu Open Week for Quantal: Call for Instructors

The Ubuntu Open Week is one of the big Classroom events we have each cycle. This time, it will be taking place from the 24th to the 26th of October, and sessions will last from 13 to 18 UTC. For those of you who do not know what this is all about, it is a community-oriented and community-driven event where people from different teams explain what work they do in the community, so you can choose the areas you like the most, and help us grow as a strong community. You can find more information about it in https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuOpenWeek.

Now, we are looking for instructors. But before explaining anything, let me remind you that for this cycle, as accorded during UDS, we will be having 2 days of lovely-IRC sessions (Wednesday and Thursday), and we’ll be wrapping up with a day full of On Air! sessions (Friday). So, based on that, we are looking for people who have been involved with a team for a long time, and would like to explain clearly how things work on it. That way, people around the world would be encouraged to join in what they like the most.

If you want to take a slot, just grab it, but make sure to let me (JoseeAntonioR on #ubuntu-classroom-backstage on freenode, joseeantonior at ubuntu dot com) or Philip Ballew (philballew on #ubuntu-classroom-backstage on freenode, philipballew at ubuntu dot com) know, by pinging us on IRC, or sending us an email. Please make sure to pass on this announcement to anyone who can be interested on being part of this event. Thanks for your interest!

Ubuntu Developer Week is over – thanks everyone

Thanks a lot to all the presenters at Ubuntu Developer Week! Thanks a lot also to everyone who joined the sessions and who helped set them up. This UDW was another great success. We had up to 300 people sessions around at peak times, lots of great questions and lots of excitement. It’s events like this where you can get a better sense how Ubuntu development works, can see Open Source development in action and get to know the people.

All the logs of the sessions are now available from the Ubuntu Developer Week page. Thanks again everyone!

Here’s a run through the sessions of the last day:

  • Getting started with app development and Intro to translations in Ubuntu – David Planella talked about two topics very close to his heart, Apps in Ubuntu and Translations in Ubuntu. Within 30 minutes each, he managed to give a nice overview and also to address all incoming questions.
  • Adding test cases with UTAH and Q&A about test automation  – UTAH is the Ubuntu Test Automation Harness and Gema Gomez-Solano explained in quite some detail how it works and why this changes how we put Ubuntu together a lot. She also explained how to get involved by adding new test-cases. Please have a look at the logs and help out!
  • Getting started with Ubuntu WebApps – Alex Launi and Alex Abreu did a great job explaining how Ubuntu WebApps works and how to get started implementing your own. It’s great to see how easily the Desktop and the Web can get closer. Be sure to check it out.
  • u1db: synced data for your apps on many platforms – The Ubuntu One team has been cooking something really nice for us and Stuart Langridge showed trivial it is to get up and running with your own databases. It’s a great and very natural way to use, store and sync data, in any application.
  • Developers Roundtable – Benjamin Drung and Scott Kitterman were around to answer all kinds of development-related questions and did a nice job of easing everyone into a comfortable atmosphere. Particularly talking from their own experience is nice to read.

Ubuntu Developer Week always flies by much too quickly, but there will be more events related to Ubuntu development, so stay tuned.

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